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de Tremaudan, Gunny

Andre Ovide Joseph Marie de Tremaudan, known as Gunny, was born the second son of Desire and Yvonne de Tremaudan on August 10th, 1915 in The Pas. His father Desire had emigrated from France in 1893 as a child, and moved to The Pas in 1911 at the urging of his brother August. August de Tremaudan had founded the town's first newspaper, the Hudson Bay Herald, and Desire joined him in this new venture as well as a real estate business. Gunny received his primary education at Sacred Heart School, and later attended college in Gravelbourg, Saskatchewan. He joined the Canadian Army early in World War II, during which time he met his future wife, Katherine Decker, an American woman. After the war they spent some time in B.C., The Pas, and the United States, before returning to The Pas in 1956. Gunny worked at Scott National for many years. He also worked for New York State Power and Gas for 5 years and owned a radio and tv store for several years. Gunny and Katherine had seven sons and two daughters.

de Peña, Joan

Dr. Joan Finkle de Peña was a longtime serving faculty member with the Department of Anthropology, University of Manitoba. She was born in Lincoln, Nebraska in 1923. She later attended the University of Nebraska (1945) and Columbia University, where she received her Bachelor of Arts, and Master of Arts (1948), respectively. In 1959 she attained a PhD in Anthropology from Indiana University, and she was subsequently employed at St. Louis University (Missouri) as a professor in anthropology and anatomy. During this period in St Louis she was a pioneer in extended education, hosting a local television program geared to adults wanting to further their education. In 1966 she moved to Winnipeg, where she was hired to help build and promote the newly established Department of Anthropology, University of Manitoba. At the University of Manitoba, Dr. de Peña taught countless undergraduate and graduate courses, as well as mentoring many graduate students, who themselves would later become anthropologists. She also served 6 years as head of the department, retiring from teaching in 1987.

During her years as a graduate student, she conducted research in Puerto Rico, and later as a faculty member at the University of Manitoba, she continued her academic research work with her studies of the Inuit of the North. Dr. de Peña was internationally respected by her colleagues in the field of anthropology, often attending and contributing papers to national and international conferences. She held memberships in several Professional Societies including The American Anthropology Association, The American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, The Canadian Association of Physical Anthropologists, The New York Academy of Sciences and Sigma Xi (honours) Scientific Research Society, to name a few. Dr. de Peña passed away on August 31, 2009. She had two children, Katia and Morgan.

de Pencier, Theodore Frederick Wells

Canon Theodore Frederick Wells de Pencier served as a priest, primarily in the Dioceses of New Westminster and Cariboo. Born in 1896, he completed a Bachelor of Arts at the University of Toronto (1920) and became Licentiate of Theology from Trinity College (1922). Appointed Deacon in 1921, he was licensed to officiate in the Diocese of New Westminster (1921-1922). Rector of St. John, Whonnock with St. John the Evangelist, Maple Ridge (1922-1926), he left the province to become Vicar of St. Patrick's Church, Guelph with Arkell, Ontario (1926-1927). He returned to British Columbia in 1927 and served as Rector of St. Michael and All Angels in Prince George (1927-1930), and as missionary of St. Mary's and St. Paul's Indian churches in Lytton (1930-1934). He was assistant priest in Belize, Honduras (1934-1935) and returned to Vancouver as incumbent of St. Peter's Church (1925-1940). During the World War II, de Pencier was appointed Chaplain of the Canadian Active Service Forces Overseas (1940-1945). After his war service, he began a ministry as Rector of All Saints' Church in Burnaby (1945-1963). He was appointed Rural Dean of the Diocese of New Westminster (1948-1951), and Canon of Christ Church Cathedral of the Diocese in 1951. Mr. de Pencier contributed to the growth and expansion of All Saints' Church in Burnaby. He also instituted a bursary known as the de Pencier Bursary for students attending the Anglican Theological College. He passed away in 1977, at the White Rock hospital.

de Pencier, Theodore Frederick Wells

Canon Theodore Frederick Wells de Pencier served as a priest, primarily in the Dioceses of New Westminster and Cariboo. Born in 1896, he completed a Bachelor of Arts at the University of Toronto (1920) and became Licentiate of Theology from Trinity College (1922). Appointed Deacon in 1921, he was licensed to officiate in the Diocese of New Westminster (1921-1922). Rector of St. John, Whonnock with St. John the Evangelist, Maple Ridge (1922-1926), he left the province to become Vicar of St. Patrick's Church, Guelph with Arkell, Ontario (1926-1927). He returned to British Columbia in 1927 and served as Rector of St. Michael and All Angels in Prince George (1927-1930), and as missionary of St. Mary's and St. Paul's Indian churches in Lytton (1930-1934). He was assistant priest in Belize, Honduras (1934-1935) and returned to Vancouver as incumbent of St. Peter's Church (1925-1940). During the World War II, de Pencier was appointed Chaplain of the Canadian Active Service Forces Overseas (1940-1945). After his war service, he began a ministry as Rector of All Saints' Church in Burnaby (1945-1963). He was appointed Rural Dean of the Diocese of New Westminster (1948-1951), and Canon of Christ Church Cathedral of the Diocese in 1951. Mr. de Pencier contributed to the growth and expansion of All Saints' Church in Burnaby. He also instituted a bursary known as the de Pencier Bursary for students attending the Anglican Theological College. He passed away in 1977, at the White Rock hospital.

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