Arts and culture

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Arts and culture

646 Archival description results for Arts and culture

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"Beginners please; my life in amateur theatre"; by Bert Williams

  • CA UNB MG H 132
  • Fonds
  • [ca. 1979]

This is a photocopy of a bound volume of Bert William's "Beginners Please My Life in Amateur Theatre". The work discusses his early life, including growing up in a working-class neighbourhood of Bolton, Lancashire, England; attending school; and working at various occupations while a young boy -- in a factory, in a cotton mill, and for several cinemas. He also comments on his early years in amateur theatre, the Workers' Educational Society, the First World War (Great War), the Second World War, and his work in adult theatre, both in England and in Canada, as a director, actor, and stage hand . The volume also includes photocopies of newspaper clippings, correspondence, and theatre programmes.

Williams, Bert, b. ca. 1900

"Dragonfly Nymphs" Print

  • ON00154 MPH15.1.8
  • Item
  • 1996

Item is a framed print from the Douglas R. Greer Collection entitled: "Dragonfly Nymphs," 1996. Includes the following caption: "The nymphal form of the dragonfly (as with most aquatic insects) is the stage of the life-cycle spent underwater. The nymph stage of the dragonfly can exceed four years, during which period this fierce predator forages on smaller nymphs and baitfish." The adult dragonfly has been the subject of studies by scientists for centuries in the quest to analyze its spectacular ability for aeronautics, which are presumably performed by co-ordinating the function of 4 separate "brains" for the dragonfly's wings."

Greer, Douglas R.

"Fan-wing Mayflies" Print

  • ON00154 MPH15.1.4
  • Item
  • 1996

Item is a framed print from the Douglas R. Greer Collection entitled: "Fan-wing Mayflies," 1996. Includes the following caption: "There are more than 700 living species of North American Mayflies, but only several dozen have been copied extensively by fly-tyers, and the Fan-wing patterns were largely abandoned in the late 1800s. Though some fly-tyers would disagree, the ADAMS pattern probably began as a Mayfly, and is now North America's most popular dry fly for Trout. Mayflies are common in the mid-Atlantic Ocean."

Greer, Douglas R.

"Hatching Caddis" Print

  • ON00154 MPH15.1.3
  • Item
  • 1996

Item is a framed print from the Douglas R. Greer Collection entitled: "Hatching Caddis," 1996. Includes the following caption: "There are more than 2000 species of Caddisflies, (some species are known as sedge-flies), comprising an ever-present fertility for fly-casters on Ontario trout streams such as the Ganaraska and the Grand. Caddisflies represent an astonishing 50 per cent of the Grand River's invertebrates, and unlike Ontario's Mayflies - which live for only a day - the Caddisfly's productive life-cycle can last for a month or more."

Greer, Douglas R.

"Light & Dark Cahill (Dry), Dark Cahill (Wet)" Print

  • ON00154 MPH15.1.9
  • Item
  • 1996

Item is a framed print from the Douglas R. Greer Collection entitled: "Light & Dark Cahill, a brakeman on the Erie & Lackawanna Railroad, New York. Dry flies are tied with waterproof rooster neck-hackles, which enable them to float. The sinking wet flies are tied to emulate the underwater stage of an insect's life. A popular legend involving Daniel Cahill established this young sportsman as a conservative pioneer. The related occasion was a serious derailment of Daniel's train, and he re-entered the capsized car to retrieve a number of rainbow trout destined for a hatchery, and released them in a nearby creek."

Greer, Douglas R.

"Out of the Ordinary" Community Event fonds

  • Fonds
  • 1999-2000

Fonds consists of the records of the community event from its inception to the weeks following the final production. It includes correspondence, financial records, legal documents, schedules, lists, and photographs.

"Out of the Ordinary" Community Event

"The Dunkeld: One Salmon and Three Trout Versions" Print

  • ON00154 MPH15.1.5
  • Item
  • 1996

Item is a framed print from the Douglas R. Greer Collection entitled: "The Dunkeld: One Salmon and Three Trout Versions," 1996. Includes the following caption: "The first recorded formula for the classic Dunkeld pattern appeared in Edward Fitzgibbon's publication THE BOOK OF SALMON in 1850, but it was probably under development by expert Scottish fly-casters on the River Tay at the town of Dunkeld in the 1770s. In addition to its effectiveness on the stream, the Dunkeld is also considered by many anglers and fly-tyers to be the most beautiful example of this ancient art, and which has become the pattern of preference for sophisticated fly-casters world-wide."

Greer, Douglas R.

"The Roe Blue & Roe Purple" Print

  • ON00154 MPH15.1.6
  • Item
  • 1996

Item is a framed print from the Douglas R. Greer Collection entitled: "The Roe Blue & Roe Purple," 1996. Includes the following caption: The Roe Blue & Roe Purple wet-fly trout patterns are attributed to Bill Monaghan, a fly-tyer on the River Roe at the town of Linavady, Northern Ireland. These attractive designs were originally created as salmon flies using goat hair dyed purple and blue, now superseded by seal hair and smaller hooks. Until the mid-1990s, fly-fishing in North America was generally synonymous with wet-flies. But as fishing flourished, trout became increasingly selective, which spurred the creation of sophisticated nymph patterns emulating the actual stages of underwater life, plus many accurate imitations of emerging adult insects."

Greer, Douglas R.

"The Sasquatch: Pintail & Widgeoncollar Models" Print

  • ON00154 MPH15.1.7
  • Item
  • 1996

Item is a framed print from the Douglas R. Greer Collection entitled: "The Sasquatch: Pintail & Widgeoncollar Models," 1996. Includes the following caption: "The Sasquatch is a streamer fly named by North American aboriginals after the legendary BIGFOOT bushman of the Canadian Rockies, and YETI, the Abominable Snowman of the Himalayas. It's notable that aboriginals were tying flies 1000 years ago. Streamer flies are usually imitators of baitfish minnows, many of which were designed to use the feathers of the African Marabou in successfully substituting dyed Canadian turkey."

Greer, Douglas R.

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